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Bloggers with a Potty-Mouth

I recently read a blog post titled “You Don’t Need to Use Curse Words in Blog Posts” and I was surprised that I had a lot to say on the topic, despite the fact I don’t really ever swear – while blogging or in real life.

The blogger, Tina Marie Ernspiker opens by calling it “Idiotic” and that ” It’s like the author can’t think of another way to express themselves so they lower their standards to speak as neanderthals.” and then went on to say “It’s like the high school it-girl being popular because she’s easy. Yeah, the football team may like her, but do they respect her?”

Gotta love a little bit of casual slut-shaming too.  It kind of makes me want to take up swearing…

It’s also interesting she does seem to focus in on women swearing, also referring to “mommy bloggers” who cuss. Which does reflect my experience with swearing; that it’s much less acceptable for women to swear than it is for men. Men will even sheepishly apologise for swearing in the company of women, because we shouldn’t even hear such words, let alone say them (or write them).

It reminds me of this sex-ed paper that went viral a little while ago, where people lost their minds over the fact that a teenage girl used cuss-words in perfect context. Sure, “Go Fuck Yourself” is a little jarring to read on a school paper, but it is a perfectly reasonable response to being told “I’m clean; I don’t run around, and I don’t have any infections” as an excuse not to wear a condom.

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If she were my daughter I’d high-five her. I’d be genuinely proud. Because those words have power. There is a full stop, hard line, absoluteness about using them.

So, why should women and girls be banned from having that power?

Actually one of my own life goals is to say the C-word without blushing. Without feeling like I need to shy away from it. It’s still a long way off for me seeing as I’d even struggle to type it – for now it’s still “the C-word”.

Occasionally, I will write a swear word, for a blog or social media – because even though I don’t say them aloud I certainly think them – but more often than not I’ll delete it before I hit enter and I’ll switch it for “funk” or “shiz” or redirect the sentence entirely.

Funnily enough I will refrain from using the odd oath for the reasons mentioned in Tina Marie Ernspiker’s post; I don’t want to appear to be less respectable- even if I know that’s total and utter bull-twang.

But swearing is no more an indicator of someone’s immorality as it is of their lack of intelligence. I think it’s naive to assume that a blogger who swears, verbally or in writing, only does so because they’re unable to express themselves in other ways.

I also don’t think that blog posts with a smattering of swear-words are popular because they’re trying to be sensational, as Tina suggests.  I think bloggers who write in their authentic voice are easier to connect with, to relate to and see as a real person. Of course you can be a real person without swearing, like if I started using expletives in my writing it probably would come across awkward and forced, because it’s simply not my usual voice. It’s totally okay to NOT swear also, if you’d rather not, or you don’t feel comfortable.

My point is – I have an enormous amount of respect for the awesome, powerful, educated, rational, intelligent, sensitive women I know who swear.

And very little respect for anyone who’d think less of them because of it.

How do feel about swearing in blog posts? 

About Rachel Stewart

Rachel is the founder of Parenting Central Australia. She is raising two children, boy and girl, with her partner.She has a background in early childhood education, but right now is content to be a stay at home mum.She is passionate about birthing rights, breastfeeding and mental health. She enjoys crafting, drinking coffee (sometimes wine) and spending a little too much time on Facebook.

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29 comments

  1. I read the original piece and thought about what a judgy piece of work the writer was. The slut-shaming was cringe-worthy. I’d rather read “cunt” 500 times in a post than see a woman slut-shame other women so casually and dismissively.

  2. I read the original piece and thought about what a judgy piece of work the writer was. The slut-shaming was cringe-worthy. I’d rather read “cunt” 500 times in a post than see a woman slut-shame other women so casually and dismissively.

  3. I read the original piece and thought about what a judgy piece of work the writer was. The slut-shaming was cringe-worthy. I’d rather read “cunt” 500 times in a post than see a woman slut-shame other women so casually and dismissively.

  4. Arianwen Harris

    I’d much rather read a blog full if swears than one full of slut shaming

  5. You are so damn right. Swearing does not make me stupid. Thinking that people who swear are stupid is STUPID. Hey, look at me! I can be all intelligent and foul-mouthed at the same time. Dickhead.

  6. You are so damn right. Swearing does not make me stupid. Thinking that people who swear are stupid is STUPID. Hey, look at me! I can be all intelligent and foul-mouthed at the same time. Dickhead.

  7. You are so damn right. Swearing does not make me stupid. Thinking that people who swear are stupid is STUPID. Hey, look at me! I can be all intelligent and foul-mouthed at the same time. Dickhead.

  8. Great response Rachel! You’ve put it much more eloquently than I could have :). Swearing for me adds flavour, emphasis, personality and emotion. It’s part of who I am so I sure as fuck am not going to stop swearing on my blog just because Mrs Judgey McJudge might get her knickers in a twist!

  9. Great response Rachel! You’ve put it much more eloquently than I could have :). Swearing for me adds flavour, emphasis, personality and emotion. It’s part of who I am so I sure as fuck am not going to stop swearing on my blog just because Mrs Judgey McJudge might get her knickers in a twist!

  10. Great response Rachel! You’ve put it much more eloquently than I could have :). Swearing for me adds flavour, emphasis, personality and emotion. It’s part of who I am so I sure as fuck am not going to stop swearing on my blog just because Mrs Judgey McJudge might get her knickers in a twist!

  11. Rachel McDougall

    Nice one Rachel Stewart 🙂

  12. I write the way I speak minus the swear words only because I know some people don’t like it. I do wrote them sometimes with #$@ symbols instead of the whole word or I write it with a strike through to express myself but without the shock factor an f bomb might bring.

  13. I write the way I speak minus the swear words only because I know some people don’t like it. I do wrote them sometimes with #$@ symbols instead of the whole word or I write it with a strike through to express myself but without the shock factor an f bomb might bring.

  14. I write the way I speak minus the swear words only because I know some people don’t like it. I do wrote them sometimes with #$@ symbols instead of the whole word or I write it with a strike through to express myself but without the shock factor an f bomb might bring.

  15. I think those who swear in posts are just being themselves and the readers feel connected to the authentic author not the f-bombs. Well put post. I think if you don’t like the content, don’t read the blog.

  16. I think those who swear in posts are just being themselves and the readers feel connected to the authentic author not the f-bombs. Well put post. I think if you don’t like the content, don’t read the blog.

  17. I think those who swear in posts are just being themselves and the readers feel connected to the authentic author not the f-bombs. Well put post. I think if you don’t like the content, don’t read the blog.

  18. I always laugh a little when I see people write “c**t” or “Sh*t” rather than cunt or shit, like it’s less offensive that way

    • I think of this when I do write “shiz” or whatever other slight variation on an actual swear word. People know what I mean, so it’s totally pointless to alter it. It’s like my sweet Nanna who always used to say “Shhugar!”… we all know what she meant. 😉

  19. I always laugh a little when I see people write “c**t” or “Sh*t” rather than cunt or shit, like it’s less offensive that way

  20. I always laugh a little when I see people write “c**t” or “Sh*t” rather than cunt or shit, like it’s less offensive that way

  21. I think of this when I do write “shiz” or whatever other slight variation on an actual swear word. People know what I mean, so it’s totally pointless to alter it. It’s like my sweet Nanna who always used to say “Shhugar!”… we all know what she meant. 😉

  22. I think of this when I do write “shiz” or whatever other slight variation on an actual swear word. People know what I mean, so it’s totally pointless to alter it. It’s like my sweet Nanna who always used to say “Shhugar!”… we all know what she meant. 😉

  23. Great post – spot on. I’m not sure that slut-shaming or name calling helps when trying to get a point across. Also, not sure what the point is, aside from name calling, but anyway! Love your response 🙂

  24. Great post – spot on. I’m not sure that slut-shaming or name calling helps when trying to get a point across. Also, not sure what the point is, aside from name calling, but anyway! Love your response 🙂

  25. Great post – spot on. I’m not sure that slut-shaming or name calling helps when trying to get a point across. Also, not sure what the point is, aside from name calling, but anyway! Love your response 🙂