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Diaper Boy Doll Kerfuffle

A mother bought a doll from Toys’R’Us. This doll was dressed in blue, and labelled as “Diaper Boy Doll” with also the words “Baby cries when he wets” on the front of the packaging.

So, this a boy doll that can wee.

o-DOLL-PENIS-TOYS-R-US-570Now, I can understand having a bit of a slow day – I have them all the time. I could have bought this doll, gotten it home, opened it up, removed its nappy and then realised “Oh! It has a penis.”

My very next thought though would be: “Well, that makes sense.”

I would really hope that how boys wee is common knowledge – especially to parents. Surely that’s not actually a shock?

So, how did the mother react?

She posted this on Facebook:

“I took my daughter to buy a new baby at toys r us. And she was so excited to find a baby boy doll because it was dressed in blue. But when she went to change his diaper, this was the surprise. Why?? These r little girls that don’t need to know the anatomy,”

Righteo….

So, firstly, just to get this out of the way: dolls are not just for girls, of course boys play with dolls also. Dolls should not be exclusively produced for little girls.

doll-in-box-380x252Secondly, according to The Blaze,  the packaging does actually state “includes anatomically doll”, so what did she actually expect? Was she imagining a baby boy doll would have nothing but a hole in it for the “wee” to come out?

I personally would be pretty horrified if I bought a clearly labelled boy doll that’s supposed to wee in a nappy and discovered that it didn’t have a penis. How would I explain that to my son who obviously knows exactly how boys wee?

All that said, I do support a parent’s right to make choices which they believe are best for their children, even if I don’t necessarily agree with those choices.

But how exactly would this product need to be labelled to give sufficient warning? Would it need to have the words “THIS DOLL HAS A PENIS” across the front in big bold letters? Or can parents who this is an issue for just use some common sense when purchasing dolls for their children?

Maybe they should stick to soft bodied dolls, and don’t go places where there might be anatomically correct dolls, such as preschools or child care centres.

What do you think? Do anatomically correct dolls need to be more clearly labelled?

About Rachel Stewart

Rachel is the founder of Parenting Central Australia. She is raising two children, boy and girl, with her partner.

She has a background in early childhood education, but right now is content to be a stay at home mum.

She is passionate about birthing rights, breastfeeding and mental health. She enjoys crafting, drinking coffee (sometimes wine) and spending a little too much time on Facebook.

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2 comments

  1. Stephanie Delmore

    Spot on with your analysis and yes dolls are not just for girls.

  2. Amanda Mallory

    Lol I remember dolls like this by mail order when I was younger they were expensive and I desperately wanted them girl and boy and had to save for them – guess that makes me some kind of sick pervert at age I dont know 8 maybe in this womans view 😛