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Resumes for Parents Returning to Work

mother working at home
Returning to work can be both an exciting and daunting experience, especially writing resumes for parents returning to work. For many parents, ‘self-confidence’ is holding you back and keeping you from applying for those positions. Well we’re here to help! It’s only natural to feel intimidated and nervous about applying for a new job, but this is the perfect opportunity to re-vamp your resume and put your best foot forward.

Use Keywords

When applying for jobs it is essential that you have a well-written resume that showcases your skills, achievements and goals to the future employer. When writing your resume it is important to use keywords that reflect the job description, recruiters aren’t always experts in the field they’re hiring in, use keywords that are relevant to the jobs field and provide qualifications and experience that reflect the requirements of the job description. There’s no point in filling your resume with every single position you’ve had and then finding that the recruiter has just skipped over the important experience because they can’t find what they’re looking for.

Get to the point

A resume is there to outline your skill set and demonstrate why you’re perfect for the position, so get to the point! The last thing you want is for your resume to be given a once over scan and then thrown to the bottom of the pile, be precise with your work history and don’t fill the page with unnecessary information (save something for your interview!). Roughly, recruiters will look at your resume for around 6 seconds; they look for keywords and skills that reflect the job description and if they can’t find it quickly your resume is wasting their time. This is why it’s a good idea to tailor your resume to the position you’re applying for, by taking the time to tweak your resume you’re showing employers that you’re serious about the position and are focused on putting your best foot forward.  Highlight work history that reflects the skills and experience they’re looking for rather than listing every job you’ve had and wasting your 6 seconds on irrelevant information.

Relevant Experience

Include ANY relevant experience you may have – even if it’s unpaid work. Getting your resume ready for your return to the workplace can be a bit scary; you’re faced with questions like Where do I start? What experience do I list? Is a stay at home mum work experience? Being away from the workplace for a while can leave you feeling left out, but take this opportunity to come back to the workforce with a new and improved resume that reflects the best work ethic in you! The biggest mistake parents make is referring to their time away from work as ‘a stay at home parent’, don’t let those unpaid duties like volunteering at the school tuck-shop, hosting and organizing mother groups and volunteering your time to school based activities go to waste! Utilize these and turn them into ‘work talk’; tuck-shop duties include money handling, customer service and organizational skills, volunteering shows your commitment and eagerness to work.

Don’t be modest

Your resume should reflect your best self; don’t be modest when it comes to listing your previous experience and qualifications, list the duties and responsibilities you were appointed in previous roles and keep them in alignment with the requirements of the job position at hand. Show recruiters you’re the right fit for the job and you previous experience has you well equipped for the role.

By Monique from Exceptional Tuition and Resumes
Phone: (07) 5527 8851

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